Showing posts with label condom not safe. Show all posts
Showing posts with label condom not safe. Show all posts

Thursday, March 8, 2012

Nurses Talk - There are many couples in these world preffered to have sex anytime and anywhere and forgetting the sanctity of sex. Making sex as part of their daily leisures. And all these happened because of Contraceptives, believing that AIDS can be avoided or controlled if all people who are making love or making lust can have it safely with contraceptives. Condom is one of the well-known conctraceptives, is it safe? Let's find out!
Experts tend to avoid the term 'safe sex' to refer to sex using the condom, because they acknowledge that it does not give 100per cent protection against the various sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
'Safer sex' is now the preferred term.
A Cochrane Review on health care concluded that, with consistent use, condoms are about 80 per cent effective in reducing the risk of HIV infection.
The June 2004 Bulletin of the World Health Organisation noted that with consistent use of the condom, the risk of contracting gonorrhoea was reduced by about 62per cent, and that for chlamydia infection, by only about 26per cent.
Such limited extent of risk reduction is far from being acceptable.
The effectiveness of the condom can be further compromised by the fact that condom breakage and slippage are not uncommon.
A study published in the May 2006 issue of the British Medical Journal revealed that condom slippage was experienced by up to 33per cent of the teens who had used these; and condom breakage, by up to 25 per cent.
Studies have also shown that teenagers are relatively poor users of contraceptives.
There are many reasons why some teens engage in risky sexual behaviour. These include factors such as peer pressure, negative influence of some mass media, poor self-esteem, and poor parent-child relationships.
These should be considered in the design of any sexuality programme that is aimed at our young. It is our duty to provide them with the correct information, so that they can make the right decisions for themselves.-Dr John Hui Keem Peng
"For people who are sexually active, condoms remain our best solution to reducing risks of acquiring sexually transmitted infections (if uninfected) or transmitting these infections (if infected). Despite some inconsistencies in the evidence, studies show that condoms are an effective physical barrier against passage of even the smallest sexually transmitted pathogens," wrote Markus Steiner and Willard Cates of Family Health International.
A recent meta-analysis revealed that condoms really decrease the risk of gonorrhea and chlamydia in both men and women, but also of the genital herpes and human papillomavirus infection, if correctly employed.Many are concerned that the condom use boosts unsafe sexual behavior, but a recent review has not confirmed this."Like any prevention tool (such as seat belts or airbags) condoms are not 100% effective," wrote the authors.Still, people should know that the condom fulfills its mission integrated in the ABC strategy: abstinence, being faithful to one partner, and condom use.Still, "a more comprehensive approach is needed. Condoms cannot be the definitive answer to sexually transmitted infection, because they provide insufficient protection against many common diseases. Intercourse generally involves skin to skin contact in the external genital area not covered by a condom. The main problem with condoms is that average people, particularly teenagers and young adults, do not use them consistently, regardless of knowledge or education," said Stephen Genuis from the University of Alberta. "Numerous large studies where concerted efforts to promote use of condoms has consistently failed to control rates of sexually transmitted infection -- even in countries with advanced sex education programs like Canada, Sweden, and Switzerland."Recent researches proved that changes in sexual behavior (less partners and casual sex, and less appeal to sex workers), rather than condom use, dropped the rate of STDs in countries like Thailand and Cambodia. About 70 % of the STDs around the world occur in teenagers and young adults. "Yet innumerable adolescents saturated with condom focused sex education end up contracting sexually transmitted infections. Although factual information should be included in any discussion of sexually transmitted infections, narrow condom focused initiatives should be replaced with comprehensive evidence-based programs," said Genuis.
So there you have it, best information to answer your question about the condoms. I suggest that you keep you virginity and have your sex when you have your honeymoon. Its very wonderful to have sex to a person you really love and truly respected.


Followers

Translate